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RE: sys time to hw time WAS: two small ones



Thanks. After I read your command line I just sit here thinking why didn't I
think of that ;o)


-- 
Martin Hansen
Student at SDU Sønderborg. www.sdu.dk
Writing final project at Danfoss drives A/S. http://drives.danfoss.com

Tlf: 74 88 54 62


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Stefan Koch [mailto:stefan.koch@xxxxxxx.ch]
> Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2002 4:03 PM
> To: Hansen Martin
> Subject: AW: sys time to hw time WAS: two small ones
> 
> 
> Dear Martin
> 
> thanks for the info about the clock. What about setting the 
> hw clock after
> setting the system clock with rdate?
> 
> hwtestrtc -s `date "+%Y-%m-%d %T"`
> 
> Stefan
> 
> -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
> Von: owner-dev-etrax@xxxxxxx.com]Im">mailto:owner-dev-etrax@xxxxxxx.com]Im
> Auftrag von Hansen Martin
> Gesendet: Mittwoch, 29. Mai 2002 12:53
> An: Dev-Etrax (E-mail)
> Betreff: RE: sys time to hw time WAS: two small ones
> 
> 
>  From: Stefan Koch [mailto:stefan.koch@xxxxxxx.ch]
>  Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2002 2:43 PM
> 
> > is there a difference in setting the system clock and setting
> > the rtc?
> Yes rtc is the hardware clock, and system time is the time in 
> the running
> kernel.
> Normal the kernel clock I more precise than that of a hardware clock
> 
> on a normal pc you update the hardware clock with the system time, by
> issuing a command like
> # hwclock --systohw
> 
> And on most pc systems this is done on power down, in order 
> to remember the
> time between reboots
> 
> 
> > What
> > ntp can do is get the time of another system (providing it
> > offers an ntp
> > server service) and then continiously keep the clock speed in
> > synch with
> > this system.
> rdate does almost the same thing only that it only update the 
> time once and
> then exits.
> 
> --
> Martin Hansen
> Student at SDU Sønderborg. www.sdu.dk
> Writing final project at Danfoss drives A/S. http://drives.danfoss.com
> 
> Tlf: 74 88 54 62
>